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SergioBenatti

Oscar 2020: Previsões

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Little Joe

First Reactions:

Antonio M Abate: I guess LITTLE JOE is that kind of sci-fi too easy to dismiss. Hausner essentially works with just one idea and one only, with no visual trickery whatsoever. Maybe there’s also not that much beneath the surface, but it doesn’t leave without traces.

Charles Bramesco: Haneke’s LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. This is why I come to Cannes, for out-of-the-blue bolts of brilliance like this. Mint lab coats, high-frequency nightmare score, slow zooms, wry aestheticized horror — so much to love here

Wendy Ide: Jessica Hausner’s LITTLE JOE will be divisive I suspect. But I rather liked its synthetic oddness

David Ehrlich: Jessica Hausner is a brilliant director but I *really* struggled with how this arthouse riff on Invasion of the Body Snatchers (or The Happening) conflates anti-depressants with an alien invasion

Emma Stefansky: LITTLE JOE is a weird plant movie made even more insidious by its subtle, insignificant consequences. what does it matter if something changes you, if no one can tell?? I love that creepy shit!! gimme that creepy shit

Alex Billington: A crafty, low budget, artsy kind of The Thing-meets-Little Shop of Horrors fairytale. The filmmaking is a bit stilted and way too slow but I love the idea behind this film and the cleverness of how they brought it to life. Destined to be a cult classic

Jessica Kiang: Considering my Hausner affinity, not to mention #JessicaSolidarity, it’s a surprisingly big no for LITTLE JOE from me. Love the pastel block-colour scheme though.

Luke Hicks: gorgeous cinematography & production design. mint greens, sky blues, and corals mixed with sharper neon violets, reds, and greens. the premise falls flat after hovering over the climax for so long, which ends up being banal. but hausner is onto something great

Patrick Heidman: Visually, LITTLE JOE is astonishing. Jessica Hausner composes images & colors like no one else. And the sound/score is really something…

Donald Clarke: I have already had several fights about Jessica Hausner’s LITTLE JOE, which I loved and others didn’t. I regard that as a good thing

Adam Woodward: Jessica Hausner’s Little Joe is bloomin’ marvellous

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Pain & Glory

First Reactions:

Dave Karger: It won’t be for everyone but I absolutely loved Pedro Almodóvar’s Pain and Glory. It’s sweet, sad, and at times off-the-charts sexy. Spain would be smart to select it as its Oscar entry and I’d love to see a Best Actor campaign for the never better Antonio Banderas

Richard Lawson: The more I think about the new Almodóvar, PAIN AND GLORY, the more I love it. It’s such a disarmingly calm and contemplative look at how, as we age, all the lusts of our youths start to seem not silly, but rather special and lovely—and just shy of irretrievable. Sigh

Gregory Ellwood: Almodovar’s Pain and Glory is definitely a slow burn. Second half is pretty compelling though. Antonio Banderas is very good, potential Best Actor play but that’s a BIG maybe.

Eric Kohn: So many filmmakers resort to movies about being successful tortured artists and the results can be excruciating. But not Pedro Almodóvar. PAIN AND GLORY is his best in years, and Banderas’ performance follows suit.

Yasmin Omar: Pain and Glory is far from my favourite Almodóvar, it’s rather subdued and thoughtful where others are loud and garish. An oversight that bugged me: the actress who plays elderly Penélope Cruz has blue eyes but hers are brown

David Jenkins: Need to rewatch Talk To Her first to check, but think Pain & Glory may be Almodóvar’s masterpiece. A gorgeous, wisful, contemplative, unselfconsciously tricksy, nakedly honest melodrama, every frame exudes supreme confidence.

Xan Brooks: Adored Pain & Glory btw. A graceful swan-dive through the past, perfectly played by a careworn Banderas. Feels like Almodovar’s saddest, warmest & most personal film

Alex Billington: Almodovar’s autobiographical film is not as fanciful as his other recent work, more intimate and emotionally driven. I appreciate his openness and the simplicity of the storytelling, it’s very personal filmmaking, just didn’t connect with me at all

Eugene Hernandez: Almodóvar is my fav film artist, his cinema deeply meaningful to me. PAIN & GLORY is prob one of his greatest works but it will take me time & repeat viewings to explain why.

Cedric Succivalli: I am watching PAIN AND GLORY for the…third time tonight, I would NOT miss Pedro’s Gala for the world. After a month or so, I still consider this one to his Magnus Opus.

Kyle Buchanan: The new Almodóvar is so, so lovely

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The Climb

First Reactions

Guy Lodge: I was charmed and rather moved by Michael Angelo Covino’s clever, tender debut feature THE CLIMB, which moves beyond Hangover-era laddishness to treat bromance as, well, romance.

Anne Thompson: Un Certain Regard breakout The Climb reminds me of Wild Tales, with its raunchy unexpected character-driven comedy vignettes, and a bit of the Duplass brothers, with its co-writer costars (Michael Covino also makes his directing debut). It also feels like a Netflix movie

Alex Billington: A wacky comedy about friendship, and love, and family, and life. Seven vignettes play out over years showing the ups and downs and obnoxiousness of life – focused on friends Kyle & Mike. Not at all what I expected but still amusing.

Eric Kohn: THE CLIMB is by far one of the best movies I’ve seen at Cannes 2019
— a hilarious testosterone-fueled buddy movie that reinvents the genre with acrobatic filmmaking to spare. If studio comedies were this well-directed, cinema would thrive

Alissa Wilkinson: may I say that if you can see THE CLIMB you absolutely should

Ryland Aldrich: THE CLIMB is a fantastic exploration of the heartache of true friendship. With his captivating filmmaking style and hilariously biting dialog, Michael Covino is about to burst into the hearts of both American and international indie film fans

Jack King: feels way, way more Director’s Fortnight than Un Certain Regard? It’s funny, don’t get me wrong — not a terrible amount of depth but it’s held up by some terrific camera work and lead performances. Can see potential for La Camera d’Or.

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Olha quem voltou:

A Hidden Life

First Reactions:

Justin Chang: Terrence Malick is back, in every sense, and his A HIDDEN LIFE pretty much wrecked me.

David Ehrlich: Terrence Malick is back, baby! obviously his best film since “The Tree of Life,” but also a powerfully graceful portrait of defiance, and a provocative challenge to “Silence.”

Jason Gorber: The hills are alive with the meanderings of Malick. Film may thrill fans of director and imagery is suitably bucolic, but equally sees redemptive Nazis granting due process to a protagonist whose obstinate nature helps his beatification

Tom Page: A slight story given body by considerable emotional weight. Something for Malick to hang his never-better direction off, but is it compelling enough? It could lose an hour, but that would be to lose a course of this visual feast.

Tom Bond: Malick’s back baby! His style works so much better with serious topics and this WW2 tale of resisting the Nazis is a stunner. The first Malick to make me cry since The Tree of Life

Inney Prakash: Malick’s new film should satisfy those who feel he’s become too indulgent with the last few and mildly disappoint those who want a further departure from linearity. Plenty of beautiful moments, some mere imitations of life, lots of plant fondling.

Jake Coyle: Most of Malick’s films are spiritual but this is his most direct grappling with faith and conviction. Its 3rd act builds to an overwhelming crescendo and now I need to roll in the grass with my daughters. A beautiful & devastating rejuvenation for Malick

Todd McCarthy: Well, it’s a big swing and a miss for strike three with A Hidden Life, which sees the massively talented but often mystifying writer-director take on true-life material for the first time in this desperately indulgent and puzzlingly de-theologized study of an Austrian man who paid the ultimate price for his conscientious objector stance against the Nazis during World War II.

Mani Lazic: I found Malick’s A HIDDEN LIFE to be just fine; if the intimate story it tells is undeniably moving in itself, the big ideas that story represents are too spelled out for us in both dialogue and images. Strangely heavy-handed.

Luke Hicks: A HIDDEN LIFE is a breathtaking christian, pacifist manifesto. easily his best since THE TREE OF LIFE. august diehl and valerie pachner are so dreamy in malick’s australian mountainside spiritual epic.

Steve Pond: I understand that “Malick’s best since Tree of Life isn’t a resounding endorsement to everybody (though I liked a couple of the ones in between), but A Hidden Life really does feel monumental in a way nothing of his has in many years.

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Pintou a Palma? Futuro candidato da França?

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

First Reactions:

Anna Smith: Portrait Of A Lady On Fire is magnificent. I have a feeling that, years from now, I’ll still be talking about being part of this standing ovation

Caspar Salmon: Céline Sciamma has done it again! Loved this film whose central love story gains and gains in intensity. This is a love letter to Adèle Haenel as much as anything, a hymn to looking at the adored one. Very beautiful.

Becca Harrison: If there’s a dry eye in the house after Celine Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire they must have been closed all the way through the film. Just wow. That was magnificent filmmaking. A stunning picture of women’s love and solidarity

Another Gaze: Bowled over by Céline Sciamma’s PORTRAIT DE LA JEUNE FILLE EN FEU (Portrait of a Lady on Fire), a gorgeous and generous study of womanhood, desire, and what it means to live fully in a world of constant confinements

Tim Robey: Céline Sciamma’s PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE overcame my initial reservations and, well, caught fire: it’s a gorgeous, elegant and teasing manifesto for feminine art, with a duet of tender lead performances from Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel

Guy Lodge: As a Sciamma devotee, I was unprepared for the ostensible mannered formalism of PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE, before I tuned into all the sensual life crackling beneath its starched shell. It plays as the work of a filmmaker very much in love; eventually, and deeply, we fall too.

Jordan Farley: Céline Sciamma’s Portrait Of A Lady On Fire is superb. Devastatingly restrained and sensual. Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel are achingly good. Will be surprised if it doesn’t win something big

Emma Stefansky: PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE is a slow, quiet burn, intense and sensual. one shot and line near the end felt like someone took my heart and squeezed. it’s also GOOOOOORGEOUS

Arash Azizi: My vote for winning Palm so far: Celine Sciamma for “Portrait of a Lady on Fire.” What a gorgeous, gorgeous film!

Isabel Stevens: Palme d’Or alert!! PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE: a tender 18th century love story that critiques women’s position in the world and banishes men to the background. The ending is something else. Plus the power of art!

FilmLand Empire: Windswept austerity, fire under the ice, female romance and camaraderie… The new Sciamma is a stunner with some haunting shots and a moving tenderness. Adèle Haenel should win best actress on the back of that final scene alone

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The Lighthouse:

First Reactions

Ella Kemp: Every frame of THE LIGHTHOUSE is stunning, every flinch of this wonderfully weird horror is insane in the best way. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe are completely unparalleled, how exciting it is to be living at the same time as such talent!

AA Dowd: Dug it. Works better as lunatic comedy–and a showcase for Dafoe and Pattinson–than it does as horror. Lots of opportunity for Eggers to indulge his taste for stylishly archaic dialogue

Gus Edgar: THE LIGHTHOUSE: Eggers takes on masculinity, madness and merfolk, and it’s marvellous. Don’t think I’ve seen a better Dafoe performance.

Alex Billington: Two men on a rock in the ocean slowly go mad. Absolutely phenomenal, visceral, intense, hilarious filmmaking. Every shot is masterful. Score is astounding. Willem Dafoe & Robert Pattinson are incredible, plumbing the depths of insanity. Perfection

Jamie Graham: Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse surpasses The Witch. An astonishing descent into madness… or ascent into the light.

Gregory Ellwood: Robert Eggers The Lighthouse is a two-fer character study featuring fantastic performances by Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson. Might be Pattinson’s best

Robbie Collin: Laughing with amazement at the end of The Lighthouse. Cinema!

Peter Bradshaw: Robert Eggers’s gripping nightmare The Lighthouse is the best thing in Cannes with sledgehammer performances from Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson, like Steptoe and Son in hell

Emma Stefansky: THE LIGHTHOUSE rips: it’s terrifying, hilarious, nightmarish, and Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe shamble around in flannels and longjohns the whole time, yelling stuff like “GET TO WORK, SAYS I!!” “BARK YOU DOG!!” don’t let anyone spoil this for you

Charles Bramesco: THE LIGHTHOUSE, or FART TO BE A GOD: to specify would rob the moment of its power, so suffice it to say that this film contains a vulva shot unlike any other. (Also, this would’ve slayed pretty much everything in Competiton I’ve seen so far.)

Xan Brooks: Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse is an uproarious, hallucinatory dark-&-stormy night yarn. Joyously rolling with the cliches & performed with drunken abandon by Pattinson & Dafoe. Just fabulous, this

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Claro que eu quero que Bacurau vença um prêmio importante no @Festival_Cannes. Porém, acabei de ver o filme que se tornou meu favorito até agora: Portrait de la jeune fille en feu, de Céline Sciamma. Duas atrizes fantásticas e um plano final arrebatador. Tô encantado.

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Weekend Numbers:

1. John Wick 3: Parabellum $57M
2. Avengers: Endgame $29.4m ($770.8m, passing #Avatar last night for #2 domestic all-time. Projected final domestic B.O. north of $835m)!!!!
3. Pokemon: Detective Pikachu $24.8m ($94m)
4. A Dog’s Journey $2.5m (9m)
5. The Hustle $6.3m ($23.4m)
6. The Intruder $4.2m ($28.2m)
7. Long Shot $3.4m ($25.7m)
8. The Sun Is Also A Star $2.68m
9. Poms $2.3m ($10.3m)
10. Ugly Dolls $1.5m ($17.1m)

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On 5/18/2019 at 6:50 PM, SergioBenatti said:

Canção nova, original, de Elton John, que fecha o filme "Rocketman". Soa tão anos 1970: boba e purpurinada.

Entretanto, vou colocá-la nas concorrentes a Best Original Song. A assinatura conta muito, além dele ser um prévio vencedor na categoria.

 

Gostei. 

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The Young Ahmed

First Reactions:

Charles Bramesco: The Dardenne brothers’ teen-terrorist drama YOUNG AHMED isn’t nearly as racist as has been feared. That’s not to say it’s “good,” however

Tim Grierson: A troubling work that reveals more about its creators than their subject. And maybe that’s the point: The Dardennes are sincerely wondering how we grapple with extremists when we can’t understand their motivations. Their movie guesses but doesn’t know

Robbie Collin: I was not wild about Young Ahmed, in which the Dardennes come face to face with the first protagonist to ever defeat them

AA Dowd: YOUNG AHMED is reasonably gripping, and as starkly unsentimental as the rest of the Dardennes’ work. But it doesn’t entirely figure out its main character, which maybe why the ending they engineer for him feels so hollow—a botched Hail Mary.

Alex Billington: Eh. Way too manipulative and obvious, subpar Dardennes screenplay here trying to tackle a big topic of the day but this really isn’t their jam. I get what they’re doing with this kid and trying to respect him, it’s so plainly there, but nah it’s no good

Xan Brooks: If Young Ahmed was a novel, the Dardennes would be getting monstered for cultural appropriation. Different rules for film, it seems, & I *did* quite like this. Sad, gentle, well-intentioned tale of a radicalised teen at a crossroads

Joseph Fahim: The Dardennes, whose work enriched me for years, tackle Islam in their new film, ‘The Young Ahmed,’ and as a result end up with the worst movie of their career; an incredibly shallow yarn rife with dangerous stereotypes it never challenge

Stephen Miller: I am a sucker for the Dardenne style, but god did I love YOUNG AHMED. Risky subject matter, handled with signature intensity and grace

Joel Mayward: I’m still reeling. This is the Dardennes’ most direct treatment/critique of religion and ideology, as well as their most conventional and concise narrative. In this, it will likely be their most divisive film to date.

Yasmin Omar: As if there weren’t already enough one-dimensional presentations of Muslims as murderous fanatics, Young Ahmed adds to this tone-deaf canon with its culturally appropriative view of Islam. No thank you

J Sperling: “Young Ahmed” is a measured story from Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. It follows a young Muslim teenager who becomes radicalized and must deal with consequences of his extreme behavior. Less substance than one would hope for from the bothers.

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Frankie

First Reactions:

Tim Grierson: In which Ira Sachs largely achieves the offhand grace his films consistently seek. There are some narrative lapses, but the simple, focused wistfulness of the piece sweeps over you, building in force. Huppert is great, of course, but Marisa Tomei is sublime

AA Dowd: FRANKIE is definitely Ira Sachs’ Frenchest movie: a minor-key, melancholy gabfest about lives in transition, set against the scenic splendor of Portugal. Not a film I expect to stick with me too long, but certain images (like the last one) might

Ken Adams: can anyone do poignance like Ira Sachs nowadays, for real. Absolutely beautiful tales of the four seasons vibes, less Eustache this time around

Alex Billington: Relationships & family crash & churn like waves on a beach while on a vacation to Sintra, Portugal. A light film with a very tender touch. Ira Sachs is so wonderful at making his actors feel so comfortable in their roles, always a delight to watch them.

David Ehrlich: Isabelle Huppert at her most vulnerable. Brendan Gleeson in “sad dad on vacation” mode in khakis and a blazer. Jérémie Renier with a mustache. i can dig it.

Eric Kohn: FRANKIE is such a lovely low-key charmer. A Rohmer-like rumination on family, art, mortality, the usual jam. Not much happens but so much is said. Ira Sachs’ best ending

Tom Page: A brittle family drama with some friction, but Sachs spends too much time rummaging in the chaff when there’s more profitable kernels left wasted. And by that I mean more Brendan Gleeson please.

Gregory Ellwood: Frankie is at its best when no one speaks. Sachs can’t avoid exposition to the gods but Huppert and Tomei are superb

Jason Gorber: Frankly Ira Sach’s film is lovely, the story of a family headed by the always formidable Isabelle Huppert finds solace is decidedly unorthodox ways. Think of it as MAMMA MIA with a lot less ABBA and a lot more of an affecting and developed narrative

John Oursler: Marisa Tomei and Brendan Gleeson in FRANKIE are my favorite performances of the year so far. Authentically funny and emotionally resonant. A beautiful film abundant with beautiful moments.

Charles Bramesco: if you’re gonna die, you might as well be rich and bourgeois and in postcard-perfect Portugal while you do it. Huppert’s reached a point of iconhood where her movies bend around her instead of the other way around, and I’m all for it

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Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood

First Reactions:

Magdalena Miedl: ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD is Tarantino’s most tender film. Who’d have thunk.

Jason Gorber: Historically dubious, thematically brilliant, QT finds his form in film that could win Palme d’Or or be picketed by audiences, or maybe both. Thrilling, provocative, blackly comical, intensely unsettling masterwork

Emma Stefansky: I reeeeally liked ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD

Jordan Ruimy: QT’s latest has some of the best sequences of his career, but also some of the draggiest. A scrambling, ambitious, maddening, beautiful film. Brad Pitt steals the show. DiCaprio, as always, fantastic.

Isabel Stevens: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood or Tarantino’s bromance. Naturally in love with “the old timey movies” and LA. On set Western scenes are my fav. Wasn’t expecting to be so charmed by it

Joe Utichi: Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood is so gloriously, wickedly indulgent, compelling and hilarious. The film QT was born to make. The world is a more colourful place in Quentin Tarantino’s twilight zone. Round two, please.

Peter Bradshaw: Quentin Tarantino’s brilliant exploitation black-comedy Once Upon A Time In Hollywood finds a pulp-fictionally redemptive take on the Manson nightmare: shocking, gripping, dazzlingly shot in the celluloid-primary colours of sky blue and sunset gold.

Tim Grierson: Like a lot of recent Tarantino, this is baggy, self-indulgent, fascinatingly its own thing and ambitiously conceived. Of course it’s accomplished, sometimes dazzlingly so, but it ends up being as hit-or-miss as his last few

Xan Brooks: Tarantino lays a gaudy, explosive counter-culture circus. DiCaprio & (especially) Pitt terrific value under the lights, while evil scurries in the shadows. Some, um, third-act issues but the film’s highs are electric

Alex Billington: To be completely honest I’m not yet sure what to make of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Need to let this one marinate, don’t have an instant reaction. Most of the film is pretty good, I’m having fun watching them play around in late 60s Hollywood. Then the finale is HOLY FUCK.

Damon Wise: I wouldn’t change a single second of Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood. It did not disappoint

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14 minutes ago, SergioBenatti said:

Once Upon A Time…In Hollywood

First Reactions:

Magdalena Miedl: ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD is Tarantino’s most tender film. Who’d have thunk.

Jason Gorber: Historically dubious, thematically brilliant, QT finds his form in film that could win Palme d’Or or be picketed by audiences, or maybe both. Thrilling, provocative, blackly comical, intensely unsettling masterwork

Emma Stefansky: I reeeeally liked ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD

Jordan Ruimy: QT’s latest has some of the best sequences of his career, but also some of the draggiest. A scrambling, ambitious, maddening, beautiful film. Brad Pitt steals the show. DiCaprio, as always, fantastic.

Isabel Stevens: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood or Tarantino’s bromance. Naturally in love with “the old timey movies” and LA. On set Western scenes are my fav. Wasn’t expecting to be so charmed by it

Joe Utichi: Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood is so gloriously, wickedly indulgent, compelling and hilarious. The film QT was born to make. The world is a more colourful place in Quentin Tarantino’s twilight zone. Round two, please.

Peter Bradshaw: Quentin Tarantino’s brilliant exploitation black-comedy Once Upon A Time In Hollywood finds a pulp-fictionally redemptive take on the Manson nightmare: shocking, gripping, dazzlingly shot in the celluloid-primary colours of sky blue and sunset gold.

Tim Grierson: Like a lot of recent Tarantino, this is baggy, self-indulgent, fascinatingly its own thing and ambitiously conceived. Of course it’s accomplished, sometimes dazzlingly so, but it ends up being as hit-or-miss as his last few

Xan Brooks: Tarantino lays a gaudy, explosive counter-culture circus. DiCaprio & (especially) Pitt terrific value under the lights, while evil scurries in the shadows. Some, um, third-act issues but the film’s highs are electric

Alex Billington: To be completely honest I’m not yet sure what to make of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Need to let this one marinate, don’t have an instant reaction. Most of the film is pretty good, I’m having fun watching them play around in late 60s Hollywood. Then the finale is HOLY FUCK.

Damon Wise: I wouldn’t change a single second of Once Upon A Time … In Hollywood. It did not disappoint

Taí o filme do ano será?

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