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A Conquista da Honra


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De que se trata o filme? Não deu para entender muito' date=' somente pelas fotos. O que será que o "diretor sem lábios" está aprontando?[/quote']

Sinopse:No final da Segunda Guerra Mundial, milhares de japoneses e americanos morreram lutando na ilha de Iwo Jima. A batalha culminou com a tomada do Monte Suribachi, onde seis soldados americanos foram fotografados levantando a bandeira dos Estados Unidos.

"diretor sem lábios" smiley36.gif

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De que se trata o filme? Não deu para entender muito' date=' somente pelas fotos. O que será que o "diretor sem lábios" está aprontando?[/quote']

Sinopse:No final da Segunda Guerra Mundial, milhares de japoneses e americanos morreram lutando na ilha de Iwo Jima. A batalha culminou com a tomada do Monte Suribachi, onde seis soldados americanos foram fotografados levantando a bandeira dos Estados Unidos.

"diretor sem lábios" smiley36.gif

Essa é a sinopse padrão. Sempre postam essa.smiley36.gif Só não dá pra saber muito bem sobre o que é o filme... Ele se passa depois que a Guerra já acabou, ou ele conta a história da tomada do Monte Suribachi?

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De que se trata o filme? Não deu para entender muito' date=' somente pelas fotos. O que será que o "diretor sem lábios" está aprontando?[/quote']

Sinopse:No final da Segunda Guerra Mundial, milhares de japoneses e americanos morreram lutando na ilha de Iwo Jima. A batalha culminou com a tomada do Monte Suribachi, onde seis soldados americanos foram fotografados levantando a bandeira dos Estados Unidos.

"diretor sem lábios" smiley36.gif


Essa é a sinopse padrão. Sempre postam essa.smiley36.gif Só não dá pra saber muito bem sobre o que é o filme... Ele se passa depois que a Guerra já acabou, ou ele conta a história da tomada do Monte Suribachi?

Eu acho que o filme vai mostrar a tomada do monte...Ou vocês acham que eles vão perder um poster com aquela imagem? smiley2.gif

E eu ouvi que Spielberg estava envolvido na produção desse filme...é verdade?

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De que se trata o filme? Não deu para entender muito' date=' somente pelas fotos. O que será que o "diretor sem lábios" está aprontando?[/quote']

Sinopse:No final da Segunda Guerra Mundial, milhares de japoneses e americanos morreram lutando na ilha de Iwo Jima. A batalha culminou com a tomada do Monte Suribachi, onde seis soldados americanos foram fotografados levantando a bandeira dos Estados Unidos.

"diretor sem lábios" smiley36.gif


Essa é a sinopse padrão. Sempre postam essa.smiley36.gif Só não dá pra saber muito bem sobre o que é o filme... Ele se passa depois que a Guerra já acabou, ou ele conta a história da tomada do Monte Suribachi?

Eu acho que o filme vai mostrar a tomada do monte...Ou vocês acham que eles vão perder um poster com aquela imagem? smiley2.gif

E eu ouvi que Spielberg estava envolvido na produção desse filme...é verdade?

Ta sim.

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De que se trata o filme? Não deu para entender muito' date=' somente pelas fotos. O que será que o "diretor sem lábios" está aprontando?[/quote']

Sinopse:No final da Segunda Guerra Mundial, milhares de japoneses e americanos morreram lutando na ilha de Iwo Jima. A batalha culminou com a tomada do Monte Suribachi, onde seis soldados americanos foram fotografados levantando a bandeira dos Estados Unidos.

"diretor sem lábios" smiley36.gif

Essa é a sinopse padrão. Sempre postam essa.smiley36.gif Só não dá pra saber muito bem sobre o que é o filme... Ele se passa depois que a Guerra já acabou, ou ele conta a história da tomada do Monte Suribachi?

Eu acho que o filme vai mostrar a tomada do monte...Ou vocês acham que eles vão perder um poster com aquela imagem? smiley2.gif

Acho que é essa a imagem:

 

th-FL-016.jpg

 

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  • 2 months later...

 

Regarding Fathers

There isn't anyone out there who doesn't expect Clint Eastwood's Flags of Our Fathers

(DreamWorks/Paramount) to rank as a probable Best Picture contender

later this year' date=' but it won't be screened for another four or five

months or so why not chill and write about something else?

Then I figured, "Naaah." I knew I could at least get an idea of how

this World War II tone poem will play if I would just focus and sit

down and read a March 2005 draft of Paul Haggis's script that's been

sitting on my desktop for the last month or two. So I did that last

night, and I have to say, in all candor...

eastwoodhat.jpg

Clint Eastwood during the shooting of Flags of Our Fathers last year on a black-sand beach in Iceland, which subbed for Iwo Jima.

I'm not saying it's not a likely Oscar favorite, or that it doesn't

have the earmarks, in fact, of a presumptive front-runner. But all I

can really say for sure, having slept on Haggis's 119-page script, is

that I'm genuinely impressed, but at the same time I'm wondering how

much broad-based appeal the film will turn out to have.

Put bluntly, the script reads like Saving Private Ryan's

artier, more glum-faced brother. It has a lot of the same battle

carnage and then some, a bit of the old- WWII-veteran-looking-back vibe

and minus the manipulative Spielberg tearjerk factor but also with less

of a narrative through-line.

Fathers is a sad, compassionate, sometimes horrifically

violent piece that's essentially plotless and impressionistic and

assembled like a kind of time-tripping poem -- a script made from

slices of memory and pieces of bodies and heartfelt hugs and salutes

from family members and politicians back home, and delivered with a lot

of back-and-forth cutting.

So it's basically a montage thing that's obviously more of an art

film than a campfire tale, and that means that the sector that says

"give us a good story and enough with the arty pretensions" is going to

be thinking "hmmmm" as they leave the screening room.

Unless, of course, there's more to Eastwood's film than can be

gleamed from Haggis's script, in which case fine and I can't wait.

flagsplayers.jpg

The characters and the cast

Flags of Our Fathers is about the loneliness and apartness

of young soldiers living in two worlds -- the godawful

battle-of-Iwo-Jima world where everything is ferocious and pure and

absolute, and the confusing, lost-in-the-shuffle world of back home,

where almost everything feels off and incomplete.

There are many, many characters in Flags but it's basically

about three of the six young Marines who raised the American flag on a

pole atop Mt. Surabachi during the Iwo Jima fighting in early 1945,

resulting in a photo that was sent around the world and came to

symbolize the valor of U.S. soldiers.

Three of the flag-raisers died in battle soon after, but the three

survivors -- John Bradley (Ryan Phillipe), Ira Hayes (Adam Beach) and

Rene Gagnon (Jesse Bradford) -- were sent home to take bows and raise

funds and build morale on a big public relations tour arranged by the

military.

And the film -- the script, I mean -- is primarily about their vague

feelings of alienation from their admirers and even, to some extent,

their families. And vice versa.

iwojimagroup.jpg

(l. to r.) Ryan Phillipe, Adam Beach, Jesse Bradford

Heroes, a narrator says at the end, are something we need and create

for ourselves. But the soldiers don't get it or want it. They only feel

for each other. They may have fought for their country, but they died

for their friends.

Fathers will be what it will be, and if it's not a big

Oscar thing at the end of the day, it'll certainly settle in with a lot

of us as a mature, respectable meditation piece with its head and heart

in the right place, and Eastwood and Haggis with another big feather in

their caps.

And maybe Adam Beach, who has the meatiest role, with a Best

Supporting Actor nomination...who knows? Ira Hayes, portrayed by Tony

Curtis in a 1961 Delbert Mann film called The Outsider,

is an emotionally unruly Native American who is far less able to deal

with the guilt of being called a war hero than the other two, and it

eventually takes him down.

As ridiculously early as this may sound to the tut-tutters out there, the early front-runner status for Fathers comes from four headwind factors:

eastwoodbeach.jpg

(1) It's been directed by Eastwood, a two-time Best Picture Oscar winner (Million Dollar Baby , Unforgiven)

who's made plenty of genre-type films but when he's in his pared down

poetic mode, look out. Especially now that's reached a kind of

Bunuelian master stage in his career.

(2) The writing hand of Haggis, arguably the hottest and most

Oscar-awarded screenwriter around these days, having just won the

Original Screenplay Oscar for Crash after his Million Dollar Baby screenplay was Oscar-nominated in the Best Adapted category the year before.

(3) The whoa-he's-directing-two-movies-about-the-same-subject

facto r, which is about Eastwood shooting a second Iwo Jima film, called

Red Sun, Black Sand, that takes the perspective of Japanese

soldiers during the conflict, and particularly that of a Japanese

general to be played by Ken Watanabe. This is roughly the DGA

equivalent of a top-drawer actor gaining 40 pounds or playing a

handicapped person in an Oscar-bait performance. The sheer effort --

the audacity -- of making two Iwo Jima movies and releasing them both

this year (within three or four months of each other) means attention

will certainly be paid.

iwojimabeach.jpg

(4) The "I love you, Dad" or "I miss you, Dad" emotional factor

among all the 40ish and 50ish baby-boomer Academy members whose fathers

either served in World War II or were part of that generation, and have

either passed or are not far from this. The Academy declined to give

the Best Picture Oscar to a half-great World War II film when they blew

off Saving Private Ryan. Even if it's not unanimously adored, Flags of Our Fathers

will probably be the last ambitious and high-pedigree film to be made

about that conflict, and support will come from that. World WWII

stories are fading out along with the men who fought it, so Flags is most likely going to be the last big hurrah.

And all in all, Fathers is a hell of a three-course meal

and a very ambitious film (especially coupled with the currently

rolling Japanese variant) for a 75 year-old director to grapple with. I

love Eastwoood's energy and ambition, but let's see what happens as far

as industry acclaim and awards and all that.

[/quote']

Achei interessante então estou passando pra cá tb.smiley17.gif

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Veja o trailer "2 em 1" dos novos filmes de Clint Eastwood

 

flagsofourfathersposter.jpgClint Eastwood (Menina de Ouro) planejava fazer um filme sobre a batalha de Iwo Jima entre estadunidenses e japoneses na Segunda Guerra Mundial. Os japoneses logo reclamaram que não teriam chance de expor seu ponto de vista - e Eastwood então decidiu fazer dois filmes, um sob a perspectiva dos aliados, outro do Japão.

O trailer japonês agora é divulgado, mistura dois filmes em uma prévia só, e justamente equilibra os dois lados. Confira aqui.

Flags of our fathers, o ponto de vista dos EUA, é adaptação do livro homônimo de James Bradley sobre a batalha, uma das mais sangrentas do conflito em 1945. Em apenas um mês, 22 mil japoneses e 26 mil norte-americanos morreram para tomar Iwo Jima, ilha do Pacífico cuja importância estratégica incluía pistas de pouso. Já o filme-espelho, Red sun, black sand, conta a mesma história, mas do lado dos nipônicos.

O primeiro estréia em 20 de outubro nos Estados Unidos. O segundo, em dezembro.

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