Jump to content
Forum Cinema em Cena

O Grande Truque (The Prestige)


Nacka
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 286
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 3 weeks later...

FIcou muito ruim esse segundo trailer...

 

 

MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!! MEIO SPOILER!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Mudando de asssunto... Li a SET essa semana e lá tinha um comentário de que, após fazer a incrível mágica, o personagem de Chritian Bale começa a mudar de caráter, mudar a personalidade, meio que enlouquecendo, como se fosse algum tipo de efeito da mágica feita por ele...

 

The Spartan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Dark and Lovely

The brooding Christian Bale works his strange Hollywood magic.

  • By

     

     

     

    Logan Hill

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

prestige061016_198.jpg

(Photo: Julian Broad/Exclusive by Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who

craves adulation, worships trickery, requires suspension of disbelief,

and sells sophisticated illusions with the invaluable assistance of

pretty female accomplices? Old-time magicians in creaky theaters and

Hollywood’s leading men. Offstage, says Christian Bale, who plays a

magician in The Prestige, the parallels get even more

interesting: “You’ve got people in both professions who want to call it

an art, and other people saying, ‘That’s not art!’ And then there are

the rivalries.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher

Nolan’s new movie is a mind-bender thriller about a feud between two

turn-of-the-century magicians in London, but it feels like a La-La Land

tale of backlot backstabbing. Bale broods as an obsessive craftsman who

spars with the inferior, show-offy entertainer (Hugh Jackman) desperate

to steal his secrets. It’s a fantasy flick, sure, but the effects take

a backseat to an actor’s showdown between two franchise heroes: Batman

vs. Wolverine. My money’s on Bale, who burns holes through his co-star

with that square-jawed glare, then undercuts it with some strange twist

that happens so fast you’re not quite sure you really saw it in the

first place. “With anyone whose work involves showmanship,” Bale

explains, “the competition just gets expressed in this larger-than-life

way.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As

an actor, he seems particularly protective of his goods. “It’s great

people are curious [about moviemaking], but I wish DVDs wouldn’t give

away so much,” he says, half-jokingly. “I like being kept in the dark

myself. You know, like mushrooms: Keep ’em in the dark and feed ’em

shit. See, I think that’s an enjoyable vegetable to be.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best known for his David Blaine–like stunt of losing 67 pounds for The Machinist,

only to gain 101 pounds in six months to play Batman, Bale is a

slippery shape-shifter himself. He’s honest about having lied to

journalists, and he once ran out of a press junket at the age of 13,

sick of all the attention that followed Spielberg’s Empire of the Sun (the

National Board of Review invented the Outstanding Juvenile Performance

award just for him). The son of a dancer and a pilot in Wales, Bale is

only 32, but he’s been an actor for more than two decades. He played a

rock-star kid in a Pac-Man cereal ad at age 9; spawned an Internet cult

with the musical flop Newsies; worked with Todd Haynes,

Terrence Malick, and Kenneth Branagh; lured ladies with period-pics;

and posted a scattershot résumé of genre flops that largely wasted his

talent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’ve always been a problem for directors to cast,” he admits. “Mary Harron had enormous problems getting American Psycho

shot, because she was always being told all the other actors she should

cast before me.” Bale almost lost the Patrick Bateman part to first

pick Leonardo DiCaprio, who beat him out for Titanic, which at least makes a little more sense. He even lost the sidekick role of Robin in Batman Forever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But then came Batman Begins. And so now, with a flourish of his bat-cape, Bale, who just wrapped up Todd Haynes’s Bob Dylan film, I’m Not There, has three terrific films coming out this fall—Nolan’s big-budget The Prestige, followed

by two ferocious indies. “I think there’s a kind of pretentiousness to

the idea that serious work is only found in low-budget independent

movies—I can’t stand that snobbery,” he says. “There’s no better way to

make something sound boring than to say a film’s important so they

should go see it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That said, The Prestige is roller-coaster cinema at its whiplash wildest, while Werner Herzog’s Rescue Dawn and David Ayer’s Harsh Times are topical and important: You should go see them. In Harsh Times,

out November 10, Bale plays an Iraq War vet who can’t come down from

combat’s contact high. At home, he tries to get back in the action as a

DEA agent and celebrates his new gun-toting gig by going on a bender

that rages from one side of the Tijuana border to the other—absurdly

convinced that he’ll always be on top of the world, Ma, no matter how

low he bottoms out. “He just can’t stop moving,” says Bale, who was

drawn to the “magneticism and momentum of the disaster this man is.” In

Rescue Dawn, out December 1, he plays another soldier: Herzog’s

old buddy Dieter Dengler, a fighter pilot whose brutal experience in a

Laotian POW camp barely dampened his enthusiasm for war. In Dawn,

Bale is deeply strange and charming and utterly unsettling—nattering

small talk with the prison guards who just finished torturing him.

Bale, who’s always been unafraid to play the reprehensible or

inexplicable, shrugs off the conflicted consciences of Vietnam’s Quiet

Americans and offers up something more timely: the Blithe American, a

giddy Bush-like optimist grinning through the apocalypse, admirable for

his stupid, unflappable resilience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bale

hedges at first, but he doesn’t deny the connection between Iraq and

these men, or even Batman, whose vigilante crusade pointedly escalated

the terrorism in Batman Begins. “You can’t help but find that

violence is endlessly fascinating—and I mean true violence, not

action-movie violence,” he says, “just because it is used as the answer

to so many problems. We’re all taught as kids not to be violent, but

you can’t help but also see that violence is what works very often.

Bullies thrive.” Especially in the movies.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The Prestige já está na posição 246 do ranking do imdb. Mas o que assusta é quando vc clica no vote here.  Mas de 50% dos votos são nota 10 e a média deles é 9. De dar medo.

 

E o Pablo deu 5 estrelas e chamou de excepcional.

 

Yoh Asakura2006-10-25 19:01:21

Link to comment
Share on other sites

prestige26t.jpg

 

Interview: Hugh Jackman

 

"The Prestige"

Posted:   Tuesday, October 17th 2006 1:43AM

Author:   Paul Fischer

Location: Pasadena, CA

Hugh Jackman

may not have changed over the years, but yet he remains one of

Hollywood's busiest and most sought after actors. "My wife sometimes

jokes that she thinks I'm a little bit of a workaholic, but my

definition of a workaholic is someone who can't switch it off, which I

can do", the affable Aussie says laughingly. "I work hard and I really

enjoy it -- I've always loved acting -- but, I can switch it off." Yet

it seems that Jackman goes from one project to the next, with four

films alone opening over the next month, including the animated Happy

Feet and Flushed Away, plus The Fountain and his latest, The Prestige.

 

 

Then he has started shooting his first film as a producer, The Tourist,

is about to begin work on fellow Australian director Baz Luhrmann' s

untitled romantic epic, and yet he is no workaholic, he says,

effortlessly balancing this career

with his marriage and children. "One of the things about having a

production company is to facilitate that balance. To be shooting a film

now -- and I only work about three weeks on 'The Tourist,' so you don't

have to worry about my work load -- I can now control where we shoot,

when we shoot and what we shoot, and that's something that is important

to us. I'm very lucky, as you know. I've got a wife who, so far, has

been happy to travel with me." His wife, actress Deborra-Lee Furness,

is joining Jackman from their New York home for the premiere of The

Prestige, a period thriller from Batman

director Christopher Nolan, in which Jackman plays an obsessive

magician endeavoring to discover the secrets of fellow illusionist

Christian Bale.

 

"I was pretty much into The Prestige when I

just heard Chris Nolan was directing it, who was certainly on my radar

of the top 5-10 directors to work with," Jackman explains, when asked

why this film

in particular. "Then, I read the script, just loved it and I was kind

of shocked at how amazingly close the original script I read was to the

film that ended up being made." Despite his busy schedule, he did some

research on magic and illusion, such important elements of this film.

"I met a lot of magicians, saw a lot of acts and I read a lot. I was

actually reading about Houdini, just coincidentally, when the script

came. I was interested in that era, which is such a fascinating time,

where magic was believed. In America, at that time, spiritualism was a

greater religion than Christianity, so magicians who could do séances

and things were beyond just tricksters. They were, somehow, medians

with the other world and they held this fascination for adults."

 

 

Jackman denies that he could relate to the obsessiveness of his

character, "but I think the roles of Christian and I were tailor made.

My character is a very good magician, but Christian's is a great one.

My character elevates himself as a magician by his natural ability on

stage, and I've had a lot of experience on stage, so that's something

that comes easily to me. The character, at the beginning of the film,

is fairly optimistic, enjoys his life and is excited by the

possibilities. There's a tragedy that happens early on, in his personal

life, and then, somehow, he's fueled by this ambition and the anger

over what happened, and it turns him into being much darker, more

intense and, ultimately, very dangerous person. I wouldn't say that's

me, but I think the transformation was a lot of fun for me to play. In

terms of the character at the beginning of the film, I think it's

fairly similar to me."

 

 

While The Prestige allows Jackman to bring out his darker side, the

antithesis can be said of Flushed Away, in which he plays a snooty rat

inadvertently sent to the sewers of London where he discovers that

there's more to life than class and social mores where he meets a tough

sewer rat, played by Kate Winslet. His attraction to this Aardman

animated comedy was instantaneous. "I was in drama school in Perth,

Western Australia, during 1994, turned on my TV, and saw the last seven

minutes of The Wrong Trousers. My brother and I were laughing so hard

that we thought, 'We've got to find this.' So, we tracked it down, got

a video and used to give it as our standard present to anyone. I

thought we'd discovered them, but I think they'd won an Academy Award

at that point, but when I was in Perth, I thought we'd somehow

discovered them. So, when I got a call from that group, I was totally

in. I think it's fair to say it was selfish reasons first, and then I

thought of my son afterwards," says Jackman, laughingly.

 

 

Jackman smilingly recalls how his Roddy the Rat changed over the course

of the two years he worked on the film. "At the beginning, he was more

upper class, almost royal with that aristocratic attitude. He had two

hamsters who were his servants, so, the whole thing, going down into

the sewer, was more, "Oh, you people." It was a little bit removed and

snobbish, which actually made him not very likable. So, we changed it

from being that to being more sheltered, as he lives in this pampered

life, doesn't think of himself as a rat, but as a James Bond character

who is having the time of his life."

 

 

As with most animated films, Jackman worked alone, unlike in Australian

director George Miller's Happy Feet. "Nicole [Kidman] and I worked for

a couple of days together as we play mum and dad of the lead character

and that was fantastic." The actor says he is looking forward to

working more extensively with Kidman on the new "Luhrmann film with her

and not be penguins will be nice." The Australian epic starts filming

on March 26, Jackman confirmed, on location in Sydney, Darwin, and

Bowen, near the Barrier Reef. Already compared to the likes of Out of

Africa, Jackman laughingly describes the untitled Aussie film as "a

combination of Out of Africa, Gone with the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia --

that kind of world, a romantic adventure epic with me and Nicole."

 

 

Then, says Jackman, he goes from romanticism to Wolverine, with his

X-Men prequel. "We've now signed off on the script and if you know

about the history of 'X-Men' movies, that's a revolution for us. We're

a year away from shooting the film and we have the script which, by the

way, is unbelievable. It's a David Benioff script who's probably the

hottest writer going around town, and he was beating down our door to

write this movie. So, we have this fantastic script and hopefully I might be able to tell you who the director is by soon."

 

 

Jackman is currently shooting The Tourist, the first film out of the

gate from his Seed Productions. "Thursday was our first day and it was

a great thrill. It's a suspense thriller

written by Patrick Marber, and it's very smart and sexy." It seems that

deny it he might, but there's no stopping this boy from Oz any time

soon.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Assisti esse também! 06 Para se ter uma idéia, eu sequer sabia desse filme. Decidi vê-lo após a decepção que Jogos Mortais 3 se revelou. Estava saindo da sala e vi o pôster... olhei o nome do diretor... vi o elenco... fui para a bilheteria, comprei o ingresso e assisti.

 

Pode nãoser o melhor filme lançado esse ano no Brasil, mas é meu preferido dentre eles até agora. Bale e Jackman estão espetaculares em seus papéis e a direção de Nolan continua assustadoramente boa. Pode não ser um "Amnésia", mas esse filme também dá um "nó na cabeça". Final surpreendente e roteiro levado de forma correta. 10/10 com louvor.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vi hoje... muito bom!

A trinca Bale, Jackman e Nolan é impecável...

 

Só não gostei na verdade de duas coisas:


1 -  o "grande truque" ser revelado no final. Pra mim, seria mais interessante se não fosse explicado, pois quando ele explica ele quebra uma premissa que seria interessante... afinal a graça da mágica é nunca saber o truque. Logo, quando se revela o truque, pra mim perdeu um pouco da graça.

 

2 - Spoiller: o lance do Angier se multiplicar de fato é bizarro. Ganah ares de ficção que foge um pouco do clima do filme. Além do que, quando ele deixa de fazer o truque para fazer como um wizard de verdade, perde um pouco a graça para mim também. Mesmo se ele fosse um wizard de verdade, se nós nunca soubéssesmos, teria um efeito melhor... não sei, mas não gostei dessa intenção.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

acho que vou postar aqui, pq acho que postei no lugar errado... rsrs

ésse povo turista no fórum é assim mesmo, não se irritem...]

 

 

O GRANDE TRUQUE (The Prestige) 4/5

 

 

 

Entreter o público maravilhosamente enquanto o verdadeiro

truque acontece embaixo dos palcos – e dos nossos narizes - é o papel dos

mágicos. E assim o fez magicamente Christopher Nolan em seu mais novo filme.

 

 

 

O Grande Truque [The Prestige] conta com as belas atuações

de Christopher Bale, Hugh Jackman e Michael Cane para contar a história - agradavelmente original, já que pouco explorada pela indústria do cinema - de dois

grandes mágicos rivais ingleses na virada do século XIX. De um modo simplista,

poderíamos dizer que o filme se trata de uma disputa - ou porque não dizer,

obsessão - de dois mágicos para superarem um ao outro e ter para si o mérito de

o melhor mágico da Inglaterra e o possuidor do melhor truque. A resenha do

filme pode parecer sem graça para os “caçadores de ação” e sedutora aos olhos

dos amantes do cinema, mas de fato é que não deixa a dever a nenhum dos dois

espectadores. Isso porque Nolan, tal qual em Amnésia, abusa da narrativa não

linear e das reviravoltas que a acompanham do início ao fim, para criar um filme

inteiramente envolvente, atraindo, com êxito, a atenção do espectador para os

detalhes da história.

O roteiro de Jonanthan e Christopher Nolan

é rico e belo, recheado de  passagens extremamente convenientes [como

os 3 atos da mágica],  e cheias de analogias - seja entre mágica e vida

real e entre mágico e público. [vide fala final de Jackman] Como nos truques dos mágicos, Nolan entretêm o público enquanto

os elementos reveladores da trama vão sendo mostrados paulatinamente no

decorrer da história. Porém, poucos minutos depois estes elementos são substituídos

por outras verdades. E assim segue o filme causando a estranheza de que nada é

o que parece e que é só uma questão de tempo até que a verdade que nos foi a

pouco colocada seja tomada como falsa dando lugar a uma nova.

 

 

 

Nisso, o filme se enquadra na atual onda – e porque não

dizer “moda” – cinematográfica das grandes reviravoltas. A diferença entre este

e os outros filmes [falo dos fracos] que insistem nessa condição de

reviravoltas é simples. Os últimos o fazem pelo puro prazer de não deixar para

o espectador a vantagem de descobrir o fim da história, como se isto os fizesse

colocar o filme num patamar acima. Mas isso não acontece com o novo filme de Nolan,

que oferece desde o princípio os elementos-base para se deduzir cada uma das

reviravoltas da adaptação. E captar estes elementos-base é algo que, de fato, o

espectador é inteiramente capaz de fazer; basta que esteja “olhando

atentamente” - como nos pergunta a narração no início e no fim do filme.

 

Esse talvez seja o ponto que torna o filme o mais distante

de um truque de mágica, pois enquanto o mágico se esforça ao máximo para não

revelar seu truque – o que levaria sua “grande mágica” por água abaixo - Nolan

talvez exponha seus elementos exageradamente. E assim, enquanto o público mais

“preguiçoso” mantém sua mente desligada durante a exibição da película,

deixando-se absorver cada nova informação somente quando esta lhe é dada de

bandeja, o espectador atento terá percebido todos os truques da mágica da história

bem antes do fim da exibição ainda que sentado nas poltronas da última fila do

teatro [aqui, citando Borden, vivido por Bale].

 

 

 

O que incomodou a mim particularmente [spoiler] foi a

revelação do “grande truque” de Angier, personagem de Jackman. Não me agrada

quando o roteiro chega a um estado em que não consegue mais sustentar-se com

explicações plausíveis e recorre a abstrações, recaindo em fatos não reais

[quem assistiu ao filme entende qual o ponto em questão]. Em algumas outras

histórias isso funcionaria perfeitamente, mas o clima do filme - que tem seus

alicerces na humanização da mágica, sempre mostrando as explicações concretas

dos seus truques – exige explicações reais para os fatos que apresenta.

 

 

 

Mas nada disso diminui a beleza do filme de Nolan, que se

deixa inteiro envolver-se em um clima muitíssimo conveniente para o desenrolar

da história - seja pelo cenário, pelo figurino, ou pela postura dos

personagens.

 

 

 

E falando aqui nos personagens, temos que comentar o mérito

das excelentes atuações. Bale, Jackman e Cane estavam impecáveis nos papéis dos

mágicos Borden e Angier e do engenheiro Cutter. Minha única crítica quanto a

escalação do elenco talvez esteja na personagem Olívia, interpretada por

Scarlet Johansson. O papel não exige um nome tão forte de uma figura tão

presente na mídia quanto Johansson. Poderia ter sido perfeitamente vivido por

uma outra atriz, que se fizesse, tal qual uma ajudante de palco,

necessária e insubstituível, mas que se mantivesse no segundo plano, mantendo

sua condição de elenco de apoio. Esse não era, portanto, um papel para a grande

Johansson.

Enfim, o filme se sustenta e se desenrola de forma magnífica

pelas mãos de uma excelente direção e alcança sim as expectativas geradas pelos

grandes nomes que o precede. É o melhor filme em cartaz, vale a pena conferir.

 

 

Por Mônica Veras

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boa crítica... concordo principalmente com essa colocação:

 

O que incomodou a mim particularmente [spoiler] foi a revelação do “grande truque” de Angier' date=' personagem de Jackman. Não me agrada quando o roteiro chega a um estado em que não consegue mais sustentar-se com explicações plausíveis e recorre a abstrações, recaindo em fatos não reais [quem assistiu ao filme entende qual o ponto em questão']. Em algumas outras histórias isso funcionaria perfeitamente, mas o clima do filme - que tem seus alicerces na humanização da mágica, sempre mostrando as explicações concretas dos seus truques – exige explicações reais para os fatos que apresenta.

 

E acrescento não só o grande truque do Angier, por este não ser de fato um truque e sim sei lá o que (ciência??), mas também o de Alfred. Quado este revela seu truque ao final é como se o Mister M. aparecesse e desvendasse tudo. Parte do público irá adorar, mas a outra parte, a que sabe que está sendo enganada, mas mesmo assim não busca a verdade para continuar acreditando na mágica. Que é meu caso.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Boa crítica... concordo principalmente com essa colocação:

 

O que incomodou a mim particularmente [spoiler] foi a revelação do “grande truque” de Angier' date=' personagem de Jackman. Não me agrada quando o roteiro chega a um estado em que não consegue mais sustentar-se com explicações plausíveis e recorre a abstrações, recaindo em fatos não reais [quem assistiu ao filme entende qual o ponto em questão']. Em algumas outras histórias isso funcionaria perfeitamente, mas o clima do filme - que tem seus alicerces na humanização da mágica, sempre mostrando as explicações concretas dos seus truques – exige explicações reais para os fatos que apresenta.

 

E acrescento não só o grande truque do Angier, por este não ser de fato um truque e sim sei lá o que (ciência??), mas também o de Alfred. Quado este revela seu truque ao final é como se o Mister M. aparecesse e desvendasse tudo. Parte do público irá adorar, mas a outra parte, a que sabe que está sendo enganada, mas mesmo assim não busca a verdade para continuar acreditando na mágica. Que é meu caso.

 

*spoiler* sinceramente... essa do truque do Borden foi uma das coisas que eu achei mais "dadas de bandeja" ao público... primeiro com a colocação do engenheiro dizendo que é um sósia... segundo a mulher dele, sarah, dizendo que o humor dele a própria expressão dele mudava com os dias, sendo percebido nos momentos em que ele dizia a ela que o amava... ela sentia que era como se fosem duas pessoas diferentes... terceiro... e o mais óbvio... era aquele Fallen... assim que ele apareceu eu e o meu namorado dissemos na mesma hora "há é o Borden!"... justamente pq o diretor criou propositalmente um clima em cima do aparecimento do personagem bem suspeito... e depois que o Angier o captura vestido como ele é que mata de vez...

 

E, honestamente... o truque do Angier era muito mais divertido que o do Borden... rsrs

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...