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M. Night Shyamalan


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Na sua opinião, qual é o melhor filme de M. Night Shyamalan?  

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  1. 1. Na sua opinião, qual é o melhor filme de M. Night Shyamalan?

    • O Sexto Sentido
      73
    • Corpo Fechado
      40
    • Sinais
      21
    • A Vila
      59
    • Outro. Qual?
      2


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Assisti quatro filmes dele. “O Sexto Sentido” teve um dos finais mais imprevisíveis que já vi em um filme, e para mim, um ótimo final, assim como o final de “A Vila”. Ainda em “A Vila”, nunca tinha sentido uma angustia parecida ao ver uma cena de esfaqueamento. Gostei muito de “Corpo Fechado”, já assisti várias vezes, “Sinais” também. São filmes que abordam historias bem distintas entre si e para mim muito bem escritas. Escolho “O Sexto Sentido” pelo impacto que me causou na época, mas todos têm o mesmo nível para mim.

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Dificil ficar classificando os filmes do Night, gosto da maiioria dos filmes dele, só não me agradou a Dama na Água, os outros, Sexto-Sentido, Corpo Fechado,  Sinais e A Vila são ótimos. Preciso revê-los, já faz um tempo, tenho aqui em DVD, Sinais e Corpo Fechado, o que mais gosto.

 

Espero que o "homem que escuta vozes" mande bem no seu próximo projeto.

Big One2008-04-20 22:07:16

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  • 1 month later...

Shy (olha a intimidade!) fala ao New York Times sobre o momento em que percebeu que sua relação com Hollywood começaria a se deteriorar. É sobre o marketing de Corpo Fechado...

 

“I remember the moment that it happened' date=' exactly where I

was sitting at the table, the speakerphone,” Night recalled. “That

moment may have been the biggest mistake that I have to undo over 10

years so the little old lady doesn’t go, ‘Oh, he’s the guy who makes

the scary movies with a twist.’ ”

 

 

“The problem is the assumption that if I am selling the

movie — because I’m selling me — that I’m being egotistical. If Will

Smith did the same thing, it would be perceived very differently,” he

said. “You’re supposed to be hidden if you’re a director. That’s a rule

that who said in the movie business?”

[/quote']

 

 

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Excelente entrevista nova, na qual Shyamalan é questionado sobre seu ego, sua contenda com os críticos e se Fim dos Tempos é o filme que definirá ou não a continuação de sua carreira (a resposta aqui é interessante):

 

 

Do you think The Happening may end up being unfairly reviewed by critics?

 

 

M. Night (MN): I

hope not. I don't think so, maybe I am too naive. The tonality was

carefully chosen in terms of approaching it as kind of a high-end

B-movie and hopefully it will be taken that way and let them enjoy the

storytelling.

 

 

The relationship is what it is, it's one of those that will only iron out with enough time.

 

 

That actually touches on my next question. A critic for the "New York Post" said

that you "loathe critics". Is that a fair accusation or do you have

more of a love-hate relationship with critics, which is what I assume

to be the case for most directors?

 

 

MN: Look, I just want a fair shot, that's all. Let the movie do what it's gonna do, that's all.

 

 

 

balaban.jpg

Bob Balaban plays an arrogant movie critic in Lady in the Water

 

Photo: Warner Home Video

A lot of the vitriol seemed to spawn from Lady in the Water

and I assumed a lot of critics thought you were taking a cheap shot at

them through the Bob Balaban movie critic character? Personally I

didn't think it was all that much of an unfair portrayal.

 

MN: [laughing]

It's funny. I mean, come on. The movie is about the act of

storytelling. The main character's story. It's an allegory about the

creative process of storytelling and how as a writer you have to be

vulnerable and put yourself into the roles. Like when Giamatti's

character starts invoking his family that's passed away, talking about

his pain and then he becomes the character in that fairy tale and

becomes part of that story and part of that process is killing your

critics and your editors and everything in your head that says, "You're

too short. You're too fat. You're too ugly. You're too dumb. You're too

stupid..." All those things that are always in your head. You can only

shine when you let go of those things.

 

All of that stuff, in the deeper meaning of the movie, that had

its place, of letting of all that. Oh, this is when that happens and

this is the third act. Kind of approaching creativity like that; as

some sad regurgitation of some other thing.

 

 

There is a growing presence of online film blogging and film

criticism. Do you pay much attention to online rumor, speculation and

conversation or is that something you tend to avoid?

 

 

MN: I don't really

read that much. Unfortunately I am not that much of a computer guy. My

kids are much savvier than I am. My wife gets irritated by the fact of

how computer illiterate I am. I basically use the computer as a

typewriter.

 

 

With The Happening, when I saw the green band trailer, in

all honesty I was like, "Hmmm, that's it?" Then the red band trailers

came out and they were far more impressive. Is this a case where the

action is so intense that you couldn't take the green band trailers any

further?

 

 

MN: You know, I

don't know. I haven't been super-involved with why they went this way

or that way. They did show me the red band trailer and asked if it

would be all right if we put that on the Internet and I said it was

cool for me as long as it doesn't bother people. I don't know what the

rationale was with regards to the green band trailer.

 

 

Did making an R-rated movie give you a sense of more freedom or

did you simply set out to make the film you had written and it just

happens to be R-rated?

 

 

MN: It really was

the latter of that, it was just a matter of writing a screenplay that

was an R-rated screenplay and I suppose there is a PG-13 way of

shooting that, but I don't see, based on how I wrote it, that I could

do that. It was really like where it seems everything is normal and

then someone does something spontaneously horrific and I don't know how

you can do that and still pull away.

 

 

 

hulkhappening.jpg

Universal's The Incredible Hulk and The Happening will go head-to-head

 

Photo: Universal Pictures

Opening up against the Hulk seems like a rather formidable task.

 

MN: [laughing]

 

 

How do you intend to gauge the success of The Happening?

Or is that something that you determine on a personal level and how the

film works for you regardless of public opinion and box-office numbers?

 

 

MN: Well, three

things, it's just a great date for us. You know, Friday the 13th, that

movie, it's just a great date. That just worked out well.

 

Second, the market expands. Our movie is great! If it turns out

the Hulk is a great movie, then great, there's lots of moviegoers that

weekend. I'm not worried at all.

 

 

Three, our movie is done in a great number that we're going to be successful.

 

 

Depending on what corners of the media you look at there are folks that are saying The Happening is a make-or-break movie for you, even though you already have Avatar lined up at Paramount already. Do you feel any pressure in those terms?

 

 

MN: Absolute,

complete fiction. That's complete fiction. You know what that is...?

Leave the storytelling to the storytellers, that's just such poor

writing. It's just ridiculous. It's nonsense to talk like that. That's

just not at all the situation, I have been offered more movies in the

last six months than I have my entire career combined. That's just

complete nonsense. There's actually other stuff I wish I could tell you

right now, but I can't. Really, really cool stuff. It's just drama.

 

 

You know what the problem is? There is no story to tell.

 

 

I'm just making another movie and I am going to make another movie after that and another movie after that. That's the story.

 

 

Speaking of which, you have made films based solely on your

screenplays. Do you ever intend to make a film based on someone else's

work?

 

 

MN: I'd love to. I

am waiting for it to happen. Normally when I get a movie offer it is

write and direct it from scratch, as if it is a book or something like

that. Or, can you rewrite it and then direct it? A couple of times I got close on those fronts, but then I do the equation and it's like, wow,

I am going to end up changing more than 50% of this and it feels like I

am doing kind of a spec at the end of the day. Why don't I just write

my idea? The equation gets unbalanced again, but I would love to and I hope to.

 

 

From a writing perspective can you talk about some of the inspiration for The Happening?

 

 

MN: The paranoia movies. Invasion of the Body Snatchers, the original one, just stayed with me for so long and that combined with The Birds. As a genre of paranoia those are fantastic and I would even throw Night of the Living Dead in that same category to some extent. In terms of a B-movie that had an unusual relevance as a parable or an allegory.

 

 

 

airbender.jpg

Aang from Nickelodeon's "Avatar: The Last Airbender," which Shyamalan is adapting into a live-action feature film.

 

Photo: Nickelodeon

Can you tell me a little about Avatar?

 

MN: We're doing it

and I am looking at all the illustrations because we are deep into the

design of the movie. Just such cool illustrations we are looking at

right now from the production designer. We are well underway and we are

going to start building sets in August and I am just really excited.

 

 

I wish I could put my finger on what it is like to say, "Oh, it's gonna be like Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings,"

but it's not really like that. It's its own thing. We have been

striving to find the right balance between a fantasy world, and

anchoring it in a reality you can't quite put your finger on, but you

know it's real. It's not like you go, "Oh, that's Asia," but it would

be anchored in that kind of thing.

 

 

Avatar is a 100-percent live-action film right?

 

 

MN: Yes, it's 100-percent live-action.

 

 

So, I am assuming there will probably be a lot of CG in it?

 

 

MN: Yes, there will

be a lot. It's a big movie, but to serve a purpose. I don't know if you

know the material at all, but they're very much extensions of what

people are feeling, the CGI. The bending of the elements becomes a lot

about their emotions and their ability to control an anamorphous thing

and I love the psychological manifestation of that. It's like a

Rorschach Test almost, that's something I can connect with and I'll be

good at.

 

I'm not like the guys that are like Lucas and Spielberg, I

don't think like that. But I do think in psychological terms and when I

use the CGI that way, I get it. Because then I can tell the animator if

it's coming out too slowly, or it needs to move to the right, or it

needs to have a glow because she's feeling this and this is that

moment. In that I feel more confident that I can make the CGI something

that when you see it, like when you see two years from now and you see

the trailer for The Last Airbender you will go, "Wow," because you instinctively know that there is depth and reality to that moment of CGI.

 

 

That actually begins to answer a question I was going to ask you

about what your thoughts on CGI were. Because you haven't tended to use

a lot of it. You even went practical with some instances of the Scrunt

in Lady in the Water.

 

 

MN: Yeah, my first draft of The Last Airbender

had so much in it that I carved it. I totally carved it so that it

would be a lot more about insinuation and on the edges of frames. It's

a cool thing to do this cool and elaborate CGI thing, but only show you

a quarter of it on a corner of the frame. Because then you feel like

that's reality.

 

 

Okay, three final questions, the first one may take a little

longer to answer. First off, do you have any regrets in your career so

far?

 

 

MN: I've had enough

movies now that I know that it's really about the consistency and the

integrity of the work. There will be some that have huge successes

box-office wise and some lesser, but the consistency of being honest to

myself as an artist, the integrity is felt by the audience. You can

feel it when somebody is chasing the audience or sold out in some way

when they did something they didn't 100-percent believe in. There are

movies that are hugely successful and I go, "That guy's screwed."

Because I know they did it for the wrong reasons, and everybody can

feel it. They want to articulate it, you can feel it. Then they go,

"Why can't that guy open a movie after that? I don't know what

happened, his last movie made a zillion dollars." It's because in the

genetics you can feel that.

 

The reverse is also true, let's say a smaller movie that

doesn't connect on opening day for some reason, but it was done with

kind of a consistent integrity. That's the most important thing.

 

 

Well, to that effect, I guess there is a follow-up question. How

do you respond to people that say you have a large ego or you are

pretentious?

 

 

MN: The only people

that say that are people that haven't worked with me and haven't met

me. If you are getting that from the guy that is carrying the lights on

my movies then you can believe it. You'll never hear it from crew,

cast, friends, the studio; you'll never hear it that way. The thing you

have to approach your creativity, and your life I think, with an

openness of "Are you a good listener? Can you listen? Can you hear a

good idea when you hear it?" whether it is coming from a P.A. or

something and that requires an openness.

 

If anything, what you're sensing is the rareness of a movie

that is sold on the filmmaker, and that seems uncomfortable. Whereas if

that was an actor doing the same exact gesture it wouldn't be seen as

something about his ego, but more about his job.

 

 

The way I look at it is that I want a director with confidence and is sure of him/herself.

 

 

MN: You want

somebody with a strong frame of mind, but you definitely have to have

somebody that is listening. Your job as a director is to go, "Those

four ideas are great and those six are not good." You have to be able

to listen to everybody.

 

 

Will we see an M. Night cameo in The Happening?

 

 

MN: Ahhh, you gotta see...

 

 

You know I have to assume yes if you don't say, "No."

 

 

MN: [laughing] Yeah, you gotta see.

 

 

Final question, Obama or McCain?

 

 

MN: Obama.

 

 

I like to hear that!

 

 

 

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Dificil ficar classificando os filmes do Night' date=' gosto da maiioria dos filmes dele, só não me agradou a Dama na Água, os outros, Sexto-Sentido, Corpo Fechado,  Sinais e A Vila são ótimos. Preciso revê-los, já faz um tempo, tenho aqui em DVD, Sinais e Corpo Fechado, o que mais gosto.

 

Espero que o "homem que escuta vozes" mande bem no seu próximo projeto.

[/quote']

 

Pois é Alexandre, não gostar, não gostar mesmo eu só não gosto da Dama tb ...

 

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O Sexto Sentido tem o gravíssimo problema de o final ter ficado mais famoso do que o próprio filme. Infelizmente, já haviam me contado o final antes que pudesse ver por mim mesmo. Isso prejudicou muito a experiência de ver o filme. O mesmo vale para Sinais (sabia apenas do fator envolvendo "água", então o spoiler não foi tão grande). Os outros eu vi "virgem", mas não sei se tinha maturidade para compreendê-los na época. Esses dias pela primeira vez A Dama na Água, que não é tão grotesco como a crítica disse, mas mostra que Shyamalan perdeu a mão na direção (e além do mais, assisti ao filme morrendo de sono, o que sempre prejudica a experiência de ver um filme). É um diretor talentoso, mas que gostaria de redescobrir no futuro.

 

  1. Sinais = 8,5
  2. O Sexto Sentido = 8,5
  3. Corpo Fechado = 8,0
  4. A Vila = 7,0
  5. A Dama na Água = 5,5

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JÁ FALEI ISSO AQUI MAIS DE UM MONTE DE VEZES. SHYAMALAN É APENAS UM DIRETOR QUE CONTA EPISÓDIOS DO TIPO "ALÉM DA IMAGINAÇÃO" DE DUAS HORAS. QUEM CONHECE A SÉRIE SABE QUE PARA O QUE O MALANDRO ESCREVE ATÉ QUE TÁ BOM... O SEXTO SENT. É MUITO LEGAL. O MELHOR... CORPO FECH. É MUITO LEGAL, E TEM UM BOM FINAL SURPRESA TAMBÉM... AGORA: BICHO, HITCHCOCK É OUTRO LANCE. É ALTO NÍVEL... VIDE FESTIM DIABÓLICO ETC...E CHAPLIN... BEM, NO SÉC XX EXISTÍRAM DOIS GÊNIOS, NA MINHA HUMILDE OPINIÃO: EINSTEIN E CHAPLIN, E ACABOU. NÃO DÁ PRA TENTAR NIVELAR COM O RESTO DA INDÚSTRIA UM CINEASTA QUE CRIOU O QUE TODOS TENTAM FAZER HOJE. SOBRE O INDIANO, O CARA APENAS TEM O ESTILO DELE, À LA "ALÉM...". ODIEI A DAMA NA ÁGUA. MAS ODIEI VÁRIOS EPS. DE ALÉM DA IMAGINAÇÃO... MAS NUNCA DEIXEI DE VER...05dragoman22008-06-12 22:33:50

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Top atualizado. Ia editar a mensagem, mas parece que o site está interpretando errado essa ação, então vou postar de novo mesmo. Se o problema for resolvido editarei a mensagem anterior e apagarei esta.

 

  1. Sinais = 8,5
  2. O Sexto Sentido = 8,5
  3. Corpo Fechado = 8,0
  4. Fim dos Tempos = 8,0
  5. A Vila = 7,0
  6. A Dama na Água = 5,5
E que venha O Homem Melancia.

 

 

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Eu não gosto muito dessa coisa de tops, porque quando mudo de opinião, fico com peso na consciência. rs

Mas acho que quanto aos filmes do Shya, poderia ser algo assim:

 

O Sexto Sentido, Corpo Fechado e A Vila = filmes de nível (mas não os 3 no mesmo nível rs)

 

Sinais = filme bom.

 

A Dama na Água = fofinho, considerando que era uma história de ninar que ele escreveu pra filha dele... rs

 

Fim dos Tempos = O Bzão Dadaísta do Shyamalan. 06
Veras2008-06-14 21:48:21
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TOP SHYAMALAN:

 

CORPO FECHADO - 10/10

O SEXTO SENTIDO - 10/10

PS: Eu sempre mudo esses dois de posição, de nota, mas são os meus preferidos do diretor.

 

A VILA - 8/10

SINAIS - 7/10

PS: Filmes que possuem mais prós do que contras.

 

FIM DOS TEMPOS - 6/10

PS: Filme bem mediano. Indolor, incolor e inodoro.

 

A DAMA NA ÁGUA - 3/10

PS: Fraco, fraco, fraco ...
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VÍ FINAL DOS TEMPOS, FIM DOS TEMPOS, SEI LÁ: EU, DRAGOMAN2 RETIRO TUDO O QUE EU DISSE ACIMA, COMO O MEU CHAPÉU E QUERO DEIXAR CLARO QUE EU ESTOU MUDANDO DE OPINIÃO. FOI UM ERRO MEU TENTAR COMPARAR O SHYAMALAN COM ROD STERLING. EU RETIRO O QUE EU DISSE. O CARA É RUIM, METIDO E NÃO VAI MAIS ME PEGAR COM CAÔ DE FINAIS "SURPRESA". HOMEM DE UM FILME SÓ. MAS VALEU...05

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FIM DOS TEMPOS - 6/10

PS: Filme bem mediano. Indolor, incolor e inodoro.
[/quote']


Nah, Thiago, em cores o filme é! 06

 

Ah, o termo só foi pra dar um "xiste" no comentário mesmo ... 06

 

Posso me enganar, mas apesar de "Fim dos Tempos" ser um filme mediano, creio que as pauladas das críticas fará com que os apreciadores do filme se "apaixonem" mais por ele. É aquela situação em que a dor aproxima os iguais, algo que os corintianos como eu, sabemos muito bem do que se trata ... 06
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